copperbadge

copperbadge:

iamshadow21:

isi-the-fangirl:

Okay seriously, I’ve never seen this guy get any credit, but check this out. Steve had just given his speech that Hydra had infiltrated SHIELD and Project Insight was their means of taking total control. Project Insight, which must have taken hundreds of mislead SHIELD employees several months if not years to get this far, and suddenly all priorities are reversed with a few words from the Star Spangled Man With A Plan. So when Rumlow marches in and orders this kid to go through with it, he stares him down for a good 20 seconds, demanding “Is there a problem?” twice in the process. Everyone else is watching in tense silence. This guy is clearly terrified and probably in shock knowing everything he worked for was a Hydra crafted lie, but he sticks with his morals and finally works up the courage to say no, not happening. This is everyday heroism, on par with the man in the Avengers who stood up to Loki when he ordered everyone to kneel. It’s sticking up for what’s right, even in the face of repercussions and knowing your actions alone won’t stop what’s happening. At least you had the strength of character to do the right thing, when it would have been so much easier to follow along and not make yourself a target.

Give this kid a medal.

This guy is one of my favourite characters in the film, purely because of Aaron Himelstein’s performance. He is so, so wonderfully believably human, and it’s moments of realistic heroism that help stop Cap 2 from being just another film about people with highly specialised and/or superhuman abilities doing things that push the boundaries of plausability. This kid’s moment of defiance is such a small dramatic moment when compared to the epic battle that follows, but its enormity in terms of importance to the film as a whole should not be underestimated.

Also - Sharon Carter totally saves this character’s life a few seconds later. When she and Rumlow start fighting, she kicks the kid’s chair out from under him so he doesn’t get shot (because he’s rabbit-frozen), and he hits the floor and is able to hide under a desk.

BUTTON BOB 5EVER

yinyangscurse
carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

witchlingfumbles:

boazpriestly:

thezulla:

leadingtone:

On the importance of a teddy bear…
(by Begemott)

i will reblog this every time.

But what if the teddy bear is the nightmare and the creature is the protector?

It is a little-known fact that teddy bears crave and feed on the dreams of young children. It is little-known, of course, because the bears are so soft and cuddly that they convince the young children that they need them. For a while, the bear will feed on the bad dreams, leaving the child with nothing but the sweetest of dreams. But the good dreams taste better and feed them more, so eventually the teddy bear will start feeding on those, and the child will have nightmares every night. And, because the teddy bear so thoroughly convinces the child that the bear is necessary for the good dreams, they will keep sleeping with it, hoping for its magic to work again.
But the mind of a child is so rich and imaginative that it creates the means to its salvation. The monster under the bed rises, in the end, to vanquish the bear. Some nights it rises before the first nightmare night. Other times, it is at the last moment, and rises only when the bear means to suck dry every last dream and imagination in the child’s mind.
Tonight is the former. This monster was sent out in time to save its child from a single bad dream. And despite the teddy bear’s sword, the monster is fierce and devours it in a single gulp.
It is about to leave when it hears confused, wordless mumbles. The monster looks down and sees its child is awake, and looking up at it. Sleep has not faded so much that the child doesn’t scream, just asks in a sweet voice what the monster is doing there.
The monster, like the teddy bear, can’t speak. Instead it picks up the water by the bedside, hands its child the glass. Still confused, the child takes it. When the child drinks its fill and hands it back, the monster tucks it in with gentle claws.
The child murmurs a thanks and falls asleep again. And the monster leaves, satisfied that it has left its child with less fear rather than more.

holy shit that was beautiful

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

witchlingfumbles:

boazpriestly:

thezulla:

leadingtone:

On the importance of a teddy bear…

(by Begemott)

i will reblog this every time.

But what if the teddy bear is the nightmare and the creature is the protector?

It is a little-known fact that teddy bears crave and feed on the dreams of young children. It is little-known, of course, because the bears are so soft and cuddly that they convince the young children that they need them. For a while, the bear will feed on the bad dreams, leaving the child with nothing but the sweetest of dreams. But the good dreams taste better and feed them more, so eventually the teddy bear will start feeding on those, and the child will have nightmares every night. And, because the teddy bear so thoroughly convinces the child that the bear is necessary for the good dreams, they will keep sleeping with it, hoping for its magic to work again.

But the mind of a child is so rich and imaginative that it creates the means to its salvation. The monster under the bed rises, in the end, to vanquish the bear. Some nights it rises before the first nightmare night. Other times, it is at the last moment, and rises only when the bear means to suck dry every last dream and imagination in the child’s mind.

Tonight is the former. This monster was sent out in time to save its child from a single bad dream. And despite the teddy bear’s sword, the monster is fierce and devours it in a single gulp.

It is about to leave when it hears confused, wordless mumbles. The monster looks down and sees its child is awake, and looking up at it. Sleep has not faded so much that the child doesn’t scream, just asks in a sweet voice what the monster is doing there.

The monster, like the teddy bear, can’t speak. Instead it picks up the water by the bedside, hands its child the glass. Still confused, the child takes it. When the child drinks its fill and hands it back, the monster tucks it in with gentle claws.

The child murmurs a thanks and falls asleep again. And the monster leaves, satisfied that it has left its child with less fear rather than more.

holy shit that was beautiful